Dartmouth, MA

From


OUR COUNTY AND ITS PEOPLE


A

DESCRIPTIVE AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF

BRISTOL COUNTY
MASSACHUSETTS


PREPARED AND PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF

THE
FALL RIVER NEWS

AND

THE
TAUNTON GAZETTE

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF
HON. ALANSON BORDEN
OF NEW BEDFORD


THE BOSTON HISTORY COMPANY, PUBLISHERS
1899

Retyped for the web by Stephanie Anderson


Dartmouth. - This town was formed from so-called "common land" on June 8, 1664, and included the territory called Acushena, Ponagansett and Coakset. The bounds of the town were defined June 3, 1668. From this territory New Bedford was set off February 23, 1787, Westport July 2, 1787; New Bedford then included what are now Fairhaven and Acushnet. In February a small part of Dartmouth was annexed to Westport, and another tract was likewise set off March 4, 1805. On March 20, 1845, a tract was annexed to New Bedford, and another on May 3, 1888. Dartmouth is bounded on the north by Fall Reiver and Freetown, on the east by New Bedford and Buzzard's Bay, on the south by Buzzard's Bay, and on the west by Westport. It has four post-offices, viz., Dartmouth, North Darthmouth, South Dartmouth, and Nonquitt. There have been post-offices in the past at Aponagansett and Hicksville, but they were closed. The population of the town by the census of 1895 is 3,107; the number of legal voters in that year was 811, and the number of registered voters in 1897 was 713. Darthmouth forms a part of Congressional District No. 13, and constitutes the Third Bristol Senatorial District No. 13, and constitutes the Third Bristol Senatorial District and the Sixth Representative District.

Russell's Mills (Dartmouth P. O.) is a hamlet in the southern part of the town, containing a grist mill known as the Allen Howland Mill, a saw mill, a store, a blacksmith and a wheelwright shop. Mills have been in existence here from the very early history of the town. A Christain Church is maintained here.

Padanaram (South Dartmouth P. O.) is a small village situated in the southeastern part of Dartmouth on Aponagansett harbor. It has a population of 410, and contains two stores, salt workson either side of the river, one conducted by Nathaniel Howland, the other by Myron Potter, a Methodist church, a Christian, and formerly a Baptist church, a hotel, and a wheelwright shops. A Free Public Library is maintained, for which John Southworth donated $5,000 for a stone building and $3,000 for books. This was a point of considerable shipbuilding in early years; many vessels sailed from here and various industries were carried on. Capt. Jireh Sherman was an old-time merchant here. In recent years this has become a popular summer resort and is now connected with New Bedford by electric cars.

Smith's Mills (North Dartmouth P. O.) is a hamlet centrally located in the town, on the electric railroad between New Bedford and Fall River. It has a population of 285. It was one of the earliest settled points in this region. Former merchants were William and John Cummings, who also owned the mills, Hiram Whalon and Abner P. Barker. The place now contains two stores, a grist mill and saw mill, two blacksmiths and two wheelwrights, a Christian Baptist and a Quaker church.

Nonquitt is a hamlet and post-office situated on Buzzard's Bay in the extreme southeastern part of the town. In recent years it has attained considerable popularity as a summer resort and a large hotel was erected, which was burned and has not been rebuilt.

Hixville is a small settlement int the northern part of the town. A post-office was formerly maintained, but it has been abandoned. It contains a Christian church, a saw mill and blacksmith shop.

Aponagansett is a small hamlet at the head of the river and harbor of that name, in the southern part of the town. It has no business interests of account. A Quaker church is located here. Each of the hamlets named above has a school near at hand.

The town of Dartmouth is almost wholly an agricultural district, the mercantile and manufacturing interests being lest than they were many years ago. The farmers produce considerable milk for the New Bedford market and mixed farming is followed. Among prominent farmers of the town may be mentioned Andrew H. King, Silas Faunce, Warren Seabury, George Hicks, Pardon Brownell, William Davis, Zachariah Spooner, James E. and Henry T. Allen, John O. Slocum and Edward Cook.

The southern section of this town, bordering on Buzzard's Bay, has become a desirable location for summer residents, and at Bay View, Nonquitt near Padanaram, and at Saltus Point at the lower end of the Smith's Neck, many cottages have been erected.

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