Dighton, Ma.

From


OUR COUNTY AND ITS PEOPLE


A

DESCRIPTIVE AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF

BRISTOL COUNTY
MASSACHUSETTS


PREPARED AND PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF

THE
FALL RIVER NEWS

AND

THE
TAUNTON GAZETTE

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF
HON. ALANSON BORDEN
OF NEW BEDFORD


THE BOSTON HISTORY COMPANY, PUBLISHERS
1899

Retyped for the web by Stephanie Anderson


Dighton. - This was the eighth town formed in Bristol county, it having been set off from Taunton an incorporated on the 30th of May 1712. It has passed through several minor territorial changes, the first of which took off a part for the formation of Berkley on April 18, 1735. On March 2, 1743, the bounds of the town were reported by a committee. January 8, 1745, the bounds were established. On February 26, 1799, a small part was annexed to Berkley, and on June 9, 1814, the north part was set off as the town of Wellington. On February 12, 1824, the bounds between Dighton and Wellington were established and a small part annexed to Wellington. On February 22, 1826, Dighton and Wellington were reunited as Dighton and the act was accepted on February 26 of that year. On April 4, 1854, a small part was annexed to Somerset, leaving the town with its present area. The census of 1895 gives the population as 1,797, and the number of registered voters in 1897 was 398. It constitutes a part of the Twelfth Congressional District, and with Berkley and the First and Sixth wards of Taunton forms the Fifth Representative District, with 2,237 legal voters, entitling the district to one representative. The town has four post-offices, namely, Dighton, North Dighton, West Dighton, and Segreganset. It is centrally situated in the county and is bounded on the north by Taunton and Rehoboth, on the east by Berkley, on the south by Somerset and on the west by Rehoboth.

Dighton village, or South Dighton, has a post-office, three churches (Methodist, Baptist and Unitarian), three stores, two hay, grain and coal dealers, a wagon maker, a stove lining works, established many years ago by Gideon Francis; a color works now operated by Mason, Chapin & Co., of Providence; and a stove foundry which has been in operation nearly ten years. Former merchants in this village were E. F. Andrews, Charles E. Whitmarsh, and his father at a still earlier period, Allen Ingalls, William Phillips and H. N. Walker. A newspaper is published called the Dighton Rock, which is one of several printed in Fall River by Samuel E. Fiske and circulated in various towns.

It has already been stated that Dighton was a port of entry an had a custom house until 1834, when it was removed to Fall River. A considerable cotton manufacturing industry existed here in early years, and ship-building was carried onto some extent. The old Dighton Universalist Church was organized in the latter part of the last century and the church building still standing was dedicated in 1802.

North Dighton is a small village in the extreme northeast part of the town, a part of which is in the First ward of Taunton, the several industries of which have been described. There was formaly a cupola furnace here, which is not now in operation. The Dighton furnace Company has an important industry, and the paper mill of L. Lincoln & Co. does a large business. The North Dighton Co-operative Stove Foundry was incorporated in 1886. There are four churches, Baptist, Congregational, Catholic and Methodist. There are two stores and blacksmith and wagon shops.

West Dighton is a small settlement in the west part of the town, with post-office, a Baptist church and two stores. Segreganset is a new post-office near Berkley station, on the railroad; it has no business interests. For many years a wooden bridge has spanned Taunton River from Berkley to Dighton, which was superseded by a fine structure in 1897. The farming community is very largely engaged in strawberry growing for the Boston market and many foreigners have taken up the poorer lands of the town in recent years.

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