Historical Sketch of Lincoln, MA
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THIS town was incorporated as the second precinct of Concord in 1746. It was incorporated as a town in 1754, by the name of Lincoln, which name was given by Chambers Russell, Esq., whose ancestors were from Lincoinshire, England. The town averages about 5 miles in length and 3 in breadth. It has all the varieties of soil, from the richest to the poorest. Though rough and uneven, it contains some of the best farms in the county. The most celebrated is that known at different times as the Russell, Codman, and Percival farm. Flint’s or Sandy Pond, containing about 197 acres, derived its name from its being situated on the farm of Ephraim Flint, one of the original owners of Lincoln. It is a favorite resort for pickerel; and its fisheries have been considered of so much importance, that an act was passed by the legislature, in 1824, prohibiting any person, under the penalty of $2, from fishing with “more than one hook” between the 1st of December and April. Lincoln is three and a half miles south easterly from Concord, and 16 north westerly from Boston. Population, 694. It contains one Congregational church, which is situated on a hill 470 feet above high water mark in Boston. This building has been several times repaired. A steeple was built in 1755, and furnished with a bell, the gift of Mr. Joseph Brooks. The first minister, Rev. Wm. Lawrence, was ordained in 1748. The following is the inscription on his monument:

"In memory of the Rev. William Lawrence, A. M., Pastor of the church of Christ m Lincoln, who died April 11, 1780, in the 57th year of his age. and 32d of his ministry. He was a gentleman of good abilities, both natural and acquired, a judicious divine, a faithful minister, and firm supporter of the order of the churches. In his last sickness, which was long and distressing, he exhibited a temper characteristic of the minister and christian. 'Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life.'"


FROM:
Historical Collections Relating to the
History and Antiquities of
Every town in Massachusetts with
Geographical Descriptions.
By John Warner Barber.
Worcester
Published by Warren Lazell.
1848

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