Raynham, Ma

From


OUR COUNTY AND ITS PEOPLE


A

DESCRIPTIVE AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF

BRISTOL COUNTY
MASSACHUSETTS


PREPARED AND PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF

THE
FALL RIVER NEWS

AND

THE
TAUNTON GAZETTE

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF
HON. ALANSON BORDEN
OF NEW BEDFORD


THE BOSTON HISTORY COMPANY, PUBLISHERS
1899

Retyped for the web by Stephanie Anderson


Raynham. - This was the tenth town formed in Bristol county and was set off from Taunton April 2, 1731. It forms a part of the Twelfth Congressional District, with 2,459 legal voters, entitling the district to one representative. The State census of 1895 gives the population as 1,518, and the number of registered voters in 1897 was 295. the town contains three post-offices-- Judson, North Raynham and Raynham. The town is situated in the northeast part of the county and is bounded on the north by Easton; on the east by Plymouth county; on the south by Plymouth county and Berkley, and on the west by Berkley and Taunton.

The largest settlement in the town is Raynham Center, which contains a post office, the old Charles B. Gardner tack factory, which is now the Diamond Tack and Nail Works; a shoe manufactory recently started by William O. Snow and T. B. Johnson; two general stores, blacksmith and wheelwright shops, on e Congregational church, one school. Some years ago the village was quite a shoe manufacturing center, but the business is practically abandoned, with the exception of one factory mentioned above. There is a large saw mill and box-board factory about two miles northwest of the village, another two miles northeast, and another one and one half miles south, the latter operated by G. B. and E. Williams. There is a saw mill two miles to the northeast of the village. The town-hall is located at this point, a frame one story structure. In this is a library which is free and supported by individual subscriptions. The Raynham Enterprise is a weekly newspaper, published by Samuel E. Fiske.

North Raynham is a hamlet in the north part containing two general stores, post-office, blacksmith and wheelwright shops, a railroad station, two school houses, a Congregational church. The Brockton and Taunton electric railway passes through the place, along the line of which the village is scattered. James R. Tracy operates a saw mill. A short distance east of the place is a considerable settlement of colored people, who are mostly small farmers.

In the extreme southeast part of the town is a hamlet formerly called Taral, the name of the post-office now being Judson. There is a Baptist church here and a school house, but no business interests.

As will be seen the town of Raynham is largely an agricultural district, the farmers being engaged in mixed farming, market gardening, the raising of small fruits and the production of milk for market. Among the prominent farmers are J. P. Spinney, Joseph Gregory, Andrew Hall, Nathan Shaw, Gustavue L. Dean, Braddock Fields, Charles D. Lincoln, Edward H. Lincoln, David Dean, William S. Briggs, H. W. Crane, T. C. Hall, P. K. Dean, Henry Dean, Jesse King, Bradford B. King.

The herring fishery has always been a prominent industry in Raynham. Two fishing privileges for the Taunton River are sold each year, which in some years have brought $500 each, but in late years have brought much less. In 1897 the two sold for $150.

[Missing pages 202-203.]

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