Rehoboth, Ma

From


OUR COUNTY AND ITS PEOPLE


A

DESCRIPTIVE AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF

BRISTOL COUNTY
MASSACHUSETTS


PREPARED AND PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF

THE
FALL RIVER NEWS

AND

THE
TAUNTON GAZETTE

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF
HON. ALANSON BORDEN
OF NEW BEDFORD


THE BOSTON HISTORY COMPANY, PUBLISHERS
1899

Retyped for the web by Stephanie Anderson


Rehoboth. - This was the second town formed in Bristol county. It originally consisted of a great tract of "common land" called Seacunck, and was incorporated with its present name June 4, 1645. On June 6, 1649, the bounds were to be established, and on May 5, 1668, the town of Swansea was set off. On August 11, 1670, the bounds between Rehoboth and Swansea were established. July 7, 1682, the North Purchase was granted to Rehoboth and the bounds were established July 7, 1682. On October 19, 1694, the North Purchase was set off as the town of Attleborough. September 10, 1697, the bounds between Rehoboth and Attleborough were established. On February 16, 1812, the town of Seekonk was set off. The population according to the State census of 185 is 1,810, and the number of registered voters in 1897 was 357. The town forms a part of the Twelfth Congressional District, and with Attleborough, North Atleborough, Norton and Seekonk, constitutes the First Representative District, with 4, 663 legal voters, entitling the district to two representatives. The town is situated in the western part of the county and is bounded on the north by Attleborough, on the east by Dighton, on the south by Swansea, and on the west by Seekonk. There are four post-offices in the town-- Rehoboth, North Rehoboth, South Rehoboth and Harris.

The largest settlement in the town is Rehoboth, a pretty hamlet in the center of the town, containing a store, grist mill, market, blacksmith shop, a Congregational church, the Goff Memorial hall (elsewhere described), and the new car barns of the Brockton, Providence and Taunton Electric Railroad company, which passes through the village and has recently been opened for travel. A newspaper, called the Rehoboth Sentinel, is published here by Samuel Fiske, which is one of several in the county, all containing the same general news, with a change of heading and local news in each. A Baptist church stands about a mile northeast of the village, a Methodist church in North Rehoboth, and a Baptist church at South Rehoboth. The old Irons church still stands near the Attleborough line, but is not in use. The store in Rehoboth village was formerly conducted by J. C. Marvel, who was preceded by his father, William Marvel 2d. There is a saw and grist mill two miles north of Rehoboth village at a place called Perrysville, which was operated many years by Otis Perry. There is also at that point a wooden ware manufactory operated by Charles Perry & Co., an done mile west of the village is a jewelry manufactory recently established. The town almshouse is situated two miles south of Rehoboth on the Harris road. The town contains fifteen schools which were well maintained.

Harris is a mere settlement where there is a post-office and a store. The post-office takes its name from Congressman B. W. Harris. There was formerly quite a flourishing hamlet here, around the old Orleans Mills, which were burned.

At the site of the North Rehoboth post-office there was formerly a large general mercantile business carried on, which extended over a considerable territory; it was conducted by Granville Stevens. At Annawan there is a little settlement where there is a Baptist church and a hotel.

Mixed farming is carried on in this town, but the principal agricultural interest is market gardening, raising strawberries and producing milk, all of which go to the Providence market. Among prominent farmers may be mentioned James Eddy, George N. Goff, A. A. Read, Thomas E. Corey, Fread M. Corey, Warren N. Sweet, Samual T. Pierce, William Gladden, George H. Goff 2d, and orrin H. Keith.

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