Seekonk, Ma

From


OUR COUNTY AND ITS PEOPLE


A

DESCRIPTIVE AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF

BRISTOL COUNTY
MASSACHUSETTS


PREPARED AND PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF

THE
FALL RIVER NEWS

AND

THE
TAUNTON GAZETTE

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF
HON. ALANSON BORDEN
OF NEW BEDFORD


THE BOSTON HISTORY COMPANY, PUBLISHERS
1899

Retyped for the web by Stephanie Anderson


Seekonk. - This was the eighteenth town formed in Bristol county and was set off from old Rehoboth on February 26, 1812. there was no territorial change in the town until April 10, 1861, when a part of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and certain lands over which Seekonk claimed jurisdiction, lying east of a line to be determined by the Supreme Court of the United States, was annexed. This was created a municipal district on January 29, 1862, which district passed out of existence when the town officers of Seekonk were elected and qualified.

Seekonk is on the west border of the county, north of the center, and is bounded on the north by Attleborough, on the east by Rehoboth, on the south by Swansea, and on the west by Rhode Island. It constitutes a part of the Twelfth Congressional District, and with Attleborough, North Attleborough, Norton, and Rehoboth, forms the First Representative District, with 4,663 legal voters, entitling the district to two representatives. The population according to the State census of 1895 was 1,465, and the number of registered voters in 1897 was 197, showing that it is the smallest town in Bristol county in point of the number of inhabitants. It has only one post-office, which bears the name of the town, though the hamlet a that point has long been known as Luther's Corners. This place is in the southwest part of the town and contains a general store, a blacksmiths shop, a Congregational church a graded school and the large ice houses of M. A. Smith. On the outskirts of the village is the large Hopkins stock farm, where market gardening and the breeding of blooded stock is carried on. Two miles south on the Taunton and Providence turnpike is the town hall, and near it a small store.

South Seekonk is a small settlement in the south part of the town where there is a public hall, a school house, but no business interest.

The Providence division of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad passes across the northwest corner of the town, an dthere are two stations, called Perrin's station and Perrin's Bridge Station. They are without business interests. It will be seen that Seekonk is almost wholly an agricultural district, and the city of Providence begin near at had, an excellent market is accessible for garden vegetables and small fruits, the growing of which and the production of milk constitute the principal industries of the farmers. Among the leading farmers are George Clarke, David W. Peck, George West, cornelius Peck, Olney Greene, Cortlandt Bradley, John Greene, Frank West, Horatio Carpenter, Herbert Cushing, Thomas and Walter Gladding, Miles Carpenter, and Jerome Farnum.

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