Historical Sketch of New Braintree, MA
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Rays Place

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THE general court having granted 6,000 acres of land to certain persons of the ancient town of Brain tree, in the county of Suffolk, for services rendered to the public, it was called and known by the name of Braintree Farms. This tract, together with a part of Brookfield and a part of Hardwick, was incorporated in 1751, and named New Braintree. The church was embodied here in 1754, and. Rev. Benjamin Ruggles was ordained their first pastor. Rev. Daniel Foster was ordained a colleague with Mr. Ruggles in 1778. Mr. Ruggles died suddenly in 1782, in the 82d year of his age, and 62d of his ministry. Rev. John Fiske, the successor of Mr. Foster, was ordained in 1796.

The surface of this town is uneven, with moderate hills and valleys; the soil is generally good, but better adapted to grazing than tillage. The town is celebrated for good farmers, and the abundance of excellent beef; butter, and cheese produced. The township is finely watered by brooks, rivulets and springs. Ware river passes its western border. In the west part of the town is Me-min-i-misset brook, formed entirely by springs from the adjacent hills, which, running north, empties into Ware river. On this brook is an extensive and luxuriant meadow of several hundreds of acres, called Meminimisset, the name given to it by the Indians, when a hideous swamp. This was the head quarters and chief place of rendezvous of the savages at the time when Brookfield was destroyed; and near which place 8 brave men were killed, and three mortally wounded, by the Indians, Aug. 22, 1675. And hither Mrs. Rowlandson was brought a captive, who was taken by the enemy at Lancaster, on the 10th of February, 1676; and here she buried her murdered child on the 18th of that month. Population, 780. Distance. 18 miles from Worcester, and 58 from Boston. In 1837, there were 18,000 palm leaf hats manufactured; value, $4,000.


FROM:
Historical Collections Relateing to the
History and Antiquities of
Every town in Massachusetts with
Geographical Descriptions.
By John Warner Barber.
Worchester
Published by Warren Lazell.
1848

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