Historical Sketch of North Brookfield, MA
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THIS town was originally the second parish in the town of Brookfield; it was incorporated as such in 1750. It was incorporated as a town in 1812. The first meeting house in this town was raised in 1749, and completed after a few years. This house was occupied for public worship till January, 1824, when a new one, situated about half a mile north of the old one, was completed. The church in this town was gathered in 1752, and Rev. Eli Fobes, D. D., was ordained their minister the same year. Dr. Fobes was succeeded by Rev. Joseph Appleton, in 1776. The next minister was Rev. Thomas Snell, D. D., who was ordained in 1798.

The following is a southern view of the central part of North Brookfield, showing part of the Congregational church on the right, and part of the town-house on the left. The village, which has mostly been built up in the course of about ten years since, consists of about 30 dwelling-houses, and 2 churches, 1 Congregational and 1 Methodist. Deacon Tyler and Mr. Ezra Bacheler were, it is believed, the first settlers in the village. The shoe business was first begun in this place by Mr. Oliver Ward. Population, 1,509. Distance, 18 miles from Worcester, 4 from Brookfield, 30 from Springfield, and 58 from Boston. In 1837 there were manufactured in this town 24,170 pairs of boots, and 559,900 pairs of shoes, the value of which was $470,316; males employed, 550; females, 300. There was 1 woollen mill, which manufactured 9,195 yards of cloth, valued at $10,758.15.

The following inscriptions are copied from the village graveyard:

In memory of the Rev. Joseph Appleton of Brookfield. who died July 25, 1795, in the 44th year of his age, and 19th of his ministry. He was solemn and fervent in prayer, pathetic and instructive in his preaching, an example of meekness. patience, and resignation under trials. In life and at death he enjoyed the comfort of that religion which he preached and practised.

Erected in memory of Doc't Jacob Kitteredge, who died July 28th 1813, aged 63.
"Beneath the sacred honors of the tumb,
In awful silence and majestic gloom.
The man of mercy here conceals his head,
Amidst the awful mansions of the dead.
No more his liberal hand shall help the poor,
Reilive distress and scatter joy no more.
While he from dwath did others seek to save,
Death threw a dart and plung'd him in the grave."


FROM:
Historical Collections Relateing to the
History and Antiquities of
Every town in Massachusetts with
Geographical Descriptions.
By John Warner Barber.
Worchester
Published by Warren Lazell.
1848

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