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History of Lake Township, MI.
FROM History of Berrien and Van Buren Counties, Michigan
With Illistrations and Biographical Sketches
of Their Men and Pioneers.
D. W. Ensign & Co., Philadelphia 1880
Press of J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia.



This township borders on the lake-shore, south of Lincoin and Royalton, and west of Oronoko; on the south are the townships of Weesaw and Chickaming. It is a little more than a full Congressional township, there being about six sections in range 20. The lake cuts off small portions from sections 6 and 7, in range 19, but the township in that range is very nearly full. The territory embraced in the present limits of Lake township constituted a part of Oronoko until 1846, and was but little settled, except in the eastern part, for a number of years thereafter. The surface is generally level, and in the interior low and swampy. The eastern tier of sections is somewhat undulated, and consists of fertile clayey loam lands. Along the lake is a line of high sand hills. Stretching from their eastern base is a plain of sandy lands, which are separated from the swamp farther cast by a belt of fine country, which is elevated sufficiently to secure good drainage, and, having a loamy soil, affords good farming-lands. Much of the swawp, which is several miles wide and tranverses the township from northeast to southwest, has been cleared up and drained to form meadow-lands, and will in the future be the richest part of the township. Heavy forests originally covered the surface of Lake, and for many years the lumber product was the principal source of revenue. Stockraising and the general farming interests at present engage the inhabitants, although fruit-growing is yearly increasing and will soon be one of the leading industries. Hickory Creek and its tributary brooks are the only streams in the township, and were formerly improved to supply the early settlers with the necessary water-power. in the interior of the township water for domestic purposes was procured with some difficulty, many of the wells being eighty-five feet deep.

THE PIONEERS.

The pioneers of Lake first found homes in the eastern part of the township, and the settlements were begun a little before the time when Michigan became a State. John Harner was among the first., if not the first, to begin the usual improvements in the township. He settled on section 25, near the Oronoko line, and still resides there, at an advanced age. He reared sons named Michael, John, and Levi, who also built up homes in that locality. A little later Horace Godfrey settled on the same section, on the farm now occupied by his son Japhet; and at a still later period John Starr settled on section 12, where he died a few years ago. In that neighborhood still resides one of his sons, Joel; other sons were Peter and Gabriel.

Thomas Phillips settled, in 1836, in what afterwards became the R.uggles neighborhood, and lived there until his death, ten years later. One of his sons, Daniel, also died in that locality; Wear, after living in Lake a number of years, removed to Royalton, where he yet resides; William became a resident of Indiana, and Henry of California. One of the daughters, Catherine, became the wife of Henry Lemon, and died in the township in 1847. There were, besides, five other daughters in the family. In the spring of 1837, Phillips sold the mill-site on his land to Peter Ruggles and Erastus Munger, and the same year a saw-mill was erected by these parties on section 2. Peter Ruggles died there many years ago, but the mills always remained in his family. Two of his daughters grew to mature years, Sarah becoming the wife of William M. T. Bartholomew, and Emma, Mrs. James Lockey. Both yet reside in that neighborhood.

In 1839, Henry Lemon settled near the Ruggles family, building a home on the eastern part of section 3, on which he lived until his death, in 1875. Four of his children attained mature years,-Margaret, who married Charles Ellengood; William T., who removed to Kansas; Joanna, the wife of D. S. Evans, of Lake; and John S., who died in the township in 1874.

About the same time, 1839, Erastus Munger became a resident of this neighborhood, but, after 1846, removed to Berrien.

Benjamin Lemon settled on section 24, in 1842, and has been a citizen of the township almost continuously since, being at present a resident of Stevensville. His daughter, Julia, became the wife of Japhet Godfrey, and yet lives in the eastern part of the township, where also reside the son, Charles L., and the other members of the family.

On the Charles Lord place, on section 24, Bradley M. Pennell settled about 1843, and lived there until about twelve years ago, when he removed to Buchanan. Edward Ballengee, another early and prominent settler of this part of the township, also removed to Buchanan. in 1844, Comfort Pennell became a settler on section 12, and after a long residence there removed to Berrien. Harmon Bean settled on section 11 the same year, or earlier. He died in the township, leaving several sons and four or five daughters. About the same time George Neidlinger settled in that neighborhood, and still maintains his residence there. He has reared a large family, the sons being Daniel, Peter, David, George, Elias, and Solomon. Henry Hess came probably a few years earlier, and settled on section 12. He died about thirteen years ago, leaving no family.

About the same period of time, Jacob Vetter settled on section 13, but in the course of ten or twelve years located in the meadows, on section 34. David Hill and Ruel Blackman located on section 36, and yet live there, E. P. Morley settled on section 35, but subsequently removed to Weesaw.

In 1845, John Lemon, a brother of Henry and Benjamin Lemon, settled on section 12, and died there about 1870. The same year Seely H. Curtis located on the farm now occupied by Dr. J. H. Royce; and the following year, 1846, Adney Hinman, on section 25; Levan and Hezekiah Heathman, on the same section; and C. S. Hyatt, in the same neighborhood.

In 1847, John Shafer came to the township, settling first on section 25, but subsequently located on Section 13, where he is yet a resident. ; and the same year Marcus Hand and Abner Sanders made temporary settlements in the eastern part of the township. The latter was afterwards a pioneer on section 30, and the former on section 16, on the present Philip Myers place. This part of the township was not settled prior to 1850, although a few clearings had previously been made.

Among others who deserve a place among the pioneers of the township, for the service which they have done in opening the way for settlements in their respective localities, are Henry Ford, on section 30 ; V. P. Mead, on the same section; John H. Nixon and N. E. Landon, on the east half of section 27 ; J. W. Whipple, on section 31 John Soward and John Johns, on Section 15; and Isaac Hathaway, on section 9.

The condition of the settlements in the township, from 1848 till 1851, is shown by the following list of resident. property-owners, from the assessment-roll for that period:

Names

Sections

Names

Sections.

Daniel Phillips

3

David Hill

36

Wear Phillips

3

Jacob Shoemaker

37

Henry Lemon

3

E. P. Morley

35

J. E. Munger

2

Jacob Vetter

34

Lewis Johns

4

Horace Godfrey

25

G. Newton

4

John Shafer

25

Abner Sanders

30

Peter Ruggles

2

Comfort Penne

ll 12

Peter Neidlinger

13

John Starr

12

C. S. Hyatt

13

George Neidlinger

2

Zaceheus Mead

13

Gabriel Starr

2

William Weston

13

John Lemon

12

V. P. Mead

30

Henry Hess

12

Charles Brong

27

Marcus Hand

13

William S. Morley

14

J. W. Blackman

24

H. Wareham

23

Seeley H. Curtis

24

Henderson Ballengee

36

John Harner

25

A. C. Pennell

36

Adney Hinman

25

Jason Parmenter

28

Benjamin Lemon

24

John Hendrickson

30

Levan Heathinan

24

Francis Awrand

13

John Shafer

25

E. H. Walton

27

Isaac Mellon

25

N. Williams

27

Bradley M. Pennell

24

A. T. Sherwood

27

J. H. Hand

13

James Parkerton

29

John Quick

23

Samuel Parkerton

29

Edward Ballengee

10

Simon Berg

15

Reul Blackman

36

Joel Blackman

30


The township received many settlers from 1852 on, and seven years later the following were registered as the legal voters of Lake, although it is possible that not all the citizens of the township at that time are included. The figures opposite the names indicate the section on which they resided:

Names

Sections.

Names

Sections.

Francis Awand

13

Thomas Lightfoot

29

Harmon Beans

13

Zaccheus Mead

17

Amos Beans

13

Alfred Murray

16

Daniel Brown

10

W. H. Merrifield

15

George Bridgman

19

Solomon McKean

29

Levi Chase

30

V. P. Mead

30

Franklin Carr

30

Hugh McClellan

23

Dexter Curtis

25

John J. Moltinger

25

Hiram Curtis

19

Emanuel Moltinger

25

Thomas Curtis

30

Michael Moltinger

25

M. J. Dixon

28

John H. Nixon

27

Robert Daniel

2

Freegrace Norton

21

William D. Aker

17

Martin Norton

19

Francis N. Elliott

11

George W. Newton

19

Samuel Erwin

25

Thomas Nevin

19

Henry Ford

30

George Neidlinger

2

Abel French

34

George Neidlinger, Jr

2

H. L. Farnsworth

31

George F. Niles

2

Abel Goddard

30

Myers Nelson

23

Asel Goddard

30

Peter J. Piscator

24

Horace Godfrey

25

Samuel B. Parkerton

24

Daniel Gates

15

B. M. Pennell

24

Harvey W. Hawley

20

Nathan Pratt

14

John Harner, Sr

25

Comfort Pennell

12

John Harner, Jr

25

Z. B. Rathbun

21

Levan Heartman

25

George Raymond

21

James Heuthinan

29

David Smith

28

C. S. Hyatt

13

Michael Sassaman

11

Marcus Hand

16

Henry Sassaman

11

Joseph P. Hunter

24

Samuel Sassainan

11

Bennett Heatbman

30

Lewis Strong

36

Henry Hess

12

Gabriel Starr

12

David Hill

36

Joel Starr

12

Levi Harner

25

John Starr

12

Adney Hinman

25

John Soward

15

Henry M. Hinman

25

John Shafer

13

William Hendrickson

25

Daniel Stannard

25

Isaac Hathaway

9

John A. Sperry

30

Caleb Inman

7

Abner Sanders

30

Christopher Johns

15

Jared K. Terry

11

Lewis Johns

4

John Terry

2

John Johns

15

Franklin Vary

2

James Kaahr

11

George W. Wick

 

A. G. Knapp

30

W. Williams

3

N. E. Landon

21

John Wright

16

Henry Lemon

3

William Weston

30

John Lemon

12

John W. Whipple

31

Benjamin Lemon

24

P. Washburne

36

George W. Lake

25

   


The population in 1860 was 557; in 1870 it was 1006; and in 1878 the assessed valuation of the real and personal property was $158,887.

CIVIL GOVERNMENT AND LIST OF OFFICERS.

The records of the township from its organization in 1846 till 1867 have been destroyed, but from fragmentary data found in the clerk's office it appears that at the first election, held at the house of Benjamin Lemon, 18 votes were polled, and that Bradley M. Penuell was elected Supervisor; Comfort Pennell, Township Clerk; and Benjamin Lemon and Daniel Phillips, Justices of the Peace.

From 1846 till 1866 the following have been the supervisors: E. P. Morley, Comfort Pennell, Peter Ruggles, Abner Sanders, Marcus Hand, Bennett Heathman, N. E. Landon, and E. P. Morley; and the township clerks for the same period have been Comfort Pennell, E. P. Morley, J. W. Blakeman, Henry Lemon, John H. Nixon, R. L. Dudley, H. W. Hawley, and John H. Nixon.

Since the latter date the principal officers have been the following:

SUPERVISORS.

1867-68 David S. Evans; 1869, Franklin Weston; 1870-72, Isaac Hathaway; 1873-74, Norman E. Landon: 1875-76, William Williams; 1877, Norman E. Landon; 1878, Michael B. Honser; 1879, Norman E. Landon.

TOWNSRIP CLERKS.

1867, D. R. Sage; 1868, M. J. Morley; 1869-70, Solomon Maudlin; 1871-72, John Loop; 1873-74, Marshall C. Travor; 1875-76, O. P. Miller; 1877-78, William Williams; 1879, Wesley Beattie.

TREASURERS.

1867, Isaac Hathaway; 1868, James H. Hill; 1869-70, Samuel Moore; 1871, C. M. Smith; 1872-75, Albert Devoe; 1876-77, John H. Nixon; 1878, Calvin Myers; 1879. Thomas C. Hebb.

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

Isaac Hathaway, Joseph Giles, M. J. Morley, L. Heathman, John Loop, Comfort Pennell, O. P. Miller, William S. Whipple, Solomon Maudlin, Charles Lord, Japhet Godfrey, Samuel Marrs, Jeremiah Nodine, Isaac Hathaway, and Joseph Giles.

HIGHWAYS.

The township took measures immediately after its organization to locate and improve the necessary highways, which were first opened in the eastern part. The condition of the country and the meagre settlements made this work slow and burdensome. For many years there was no direct highway across the swampy lands in the central part of the township, and in the western part there were generally mere bridle-paths only until after 1858. By judicious subdivision into small districts the roads have been made to assume a fair condition. In 1879 they were in charge of John Shafer, as commissioner, and the following overseers: Samuel Marrs, John Haun, Wm. A. Feather, J. H. Royce, William McCarty, Japhet Godfrey, A. F. Morley, L. Meredith, Geo. Ennis, David Baley, William Shuler, Stephen Wright, Henry Kill, John R. Rees, John S. Barnhart, William S. Mead, Charles Hendrix, Benjamin Lemon, N. O. Carlysle, Isaac Clywer, V. B. Gulliver, and John Johns.

The Chicago and Michigan Lake Shore Railroad was constructed through the township in 1869-70, with a course parallel to the lake-shore, and about one and a half miles east. Stations have been provided at Brown's, on section 36; Morris, on section 8; and at Bridgman, on section 19. From these points the products of Lake are readily shipped, and the railroad has materially aided in developing the country and increasing its population.

THE MANUFACTURING INTERESTS

of Lake township have been confined chiefly to lumber~ mills and kindred factories. The first of this character was a saw mill, erected on section 2, on the head waters of Hickory Creek, by Peter Ruggles and Erastus Munger, in the fall of 1837. Here was cut some of the lumber which was used in the construction of the court-house at Berrien Springs. Afterwards a grist-mill was built, and was operated by the same power, both mills remaining the property of the BuggIes family until their discontinuance a few years ago.

On section 24, Benjamin Lemon got in operation a sawmill in 1845, which went to decay, and a new mill, which was subsequently built by him on the same stream, has also gone down. After 1850, John Harner put up a saw-mill on section 13, which afterwards became the property of John Shafer, but is at present idle.

On the southern township line, on section 32, a good steam saw-mill was erected about 1865, by Alonzo Sherwood, which was operated until the timber supply in that locality was exhausted. The lumber was conveyed to the lake by means of a tramway. At Brown's Station, O. R. Brown formerly had a mill, and at present one is operated there by A. L. Drew. Farther in the interior of the township Painter & Curtiss had an extensive lumber-mill, which was removed after a few years' operation. At that time the locality was known as Paintersville, and was the scene of busy activity.

In the northern part of the township, at Morris Station, H. F. Nead has at present in operation a steam saw-mill capable of cutting 8000 feet per day. At this point was formerly another mill ; and in other localities in the township saw-mills were kept in operation a short time or until the surrounding forests had been manufactured into lumber.

The largest lumber-manufacturing establishment was near the present village of Bridgman. In the fall of 1856, George Bridgman, Warren Howe, and Charles F. Howe formed the "Charlotteville Lumber Company," and here began operations by building a steam saw-mill, at a cost of $20,000. At a point west, on the lake, a pier was constructed five hundred feet long, which was connected with the mill by a railroad more than a mile in length; and to various points in the forest a railway was made, the entire length of track being about seven miles. The rolling stock consisted of thirty-three cars and the engine "John Bull," which, it is claimed, was the first locomotive ever run in the United States. The improvements cost $70,000, and the mill had a capacity of 25,000 feet per day. About seventy men were employed in the business, and the lumber found a ready sale in Chicago, whither it was conveyed from the pier by schooners. In 1863 the mill was destroyed by fire, and two other mills which were erected on the same site shared a like fate, the last one being consumed in 1870. The lumbering business here having declined, on account of the consumption of the forest products, a mill of smaller capacity was erected the same season (1870) by Mordecai Price. This was also burned in 1871. Soon after Whipple & Medaris put up a mill whieh was burned after a year's operation; and a third mill, on this site, put up by O. D. Rector, was also burned in 1878. The present mill was put in operation in January, 1879, by Codd & Price. Its capacity is 8000 feet per day.

In 1870 a stave and heading factory was built east of the railroad station at Bridgman, which has been owned by various parties, and is at present operated by Hinkley, Higman & Co. The product is several million pieces per year, and more than a dozen hands are employed.

In 1869, Webster & Whiten erected a tannery at Charlotteville, which was discontinued after several years' operation, and the building removed in 1878. The other manufacturing interests of the township are confined to the ordinary mechanic pursuits. A grist-mill is soon to be built at Bridgman.

VILLAGES.

In 1848 a village was projected on section 25, which received the name of Livingston. Eighty blocks were laid out, but nothing further was done to advance its claims to a place among the villages of the county, and the site soon became common farm property.

Charlotteville, on section 19, was the first village in the township. It was founded by the "Charlotteville Lumber Company," in 1856, and for a number of years was composed wholly of the various interests connected with the business of that firm. The name was bestowed in compliment to Charlotte Howe, the wife of one of the proprietors. The place never attained great size, but was at one time the seat of considerable business. In 1870 another of the original proprietors, George Bridgman, platted a village half a mile east, on the railroad, where a station was located that year. The survey was made by E. P. Morley, and the village and station received the name of

Bridgman.-This place has absorbed whatever interests were formerly at Charlotteville, and the entire locality is now known by the name of Bridgman. It contains a flue school-house with a number of business places arid other interests, noted below. There arc about 200 inhabitants.

The Bridgman post-office was established in 1861 with the name of Laketon. but ten years later took the name of the village. Elijah Cowles was the first postmaster, and was succeeded in 1863 by George Bridgman, who held the office until 1870. The postmasters following have been George Wood, George Wells, William Babcock, and the present incumbent, Mrs. E. A. H. Greene.

The first merchandising in the township was carried on by the "Charlotteville Lumber Company," from 1857 till the company discontinued, about five years later; and trade was thereafter continued by the successive mill owners Dexter Curtiax, Loop & Daniels, Sawyer & Mead, and P. B. Pluminer. Meantime other stores were built, and in 1869 there were three general business houses, by C. M. Smith, George W. Wells, and M. C. Traver. Dr. J. F. Berringer had opened a drug-store before that period, which is yet continued in Bridgman by him.

In 1871, Charles M. Smith put up the first store at the station, which is at present occupied by Benjamin Lemon. The next store was built several years later by Benjamin Weed, in which he engaged in trade, and was followed by Edward Palmer and Henry Chapman. In 1875, Thomas Hebb built the third store, and trade was there begun by Hebh & Howlett. The stand is at present occupied by J. T. Barnes & Co. Others in trade are Seekell, Sparr & Co. The first regular tavern in the village of Bridgman was opened in 1872 by George Maisner, and kept a few years. Near the depot the Thompson House had entertained the public since 1875.

The township did not have any professional men prior to 1856. That year Dr. J. H. Royce engaged in the practice of medicine, and has continued since residing in the eastern part of the township. The second physician was Dr. Solomon Maudlin, who located at Bridgman, and still resides there, although not in active practice. The present physician there is Dr. J. F. Berringer, and other practitioners in the township have been Drs. Sober and Imme.

The first and only attorney in the township has been George W. Bridgman, who has maintained a law-office at Bridgman since 1872.

SOCIETIES AND ORDERS.

Lake Lodge, No. 143, I. O. O. F., was organized in 1870. Its membership increased rapidly, and the lodge has flourished steadily since its organization. The meet.ings are held in a hall in the western part of the village of Bridgman.

Bridgman Lodge, No. 794, I. O. G. T, was organized in October, 1879, with 64 charter members. Joseph Codd, W. C. T.; P. C. Bridgman, W. V. T.; J. Duest. Sec.; and Charles Wheelock, Treas. At present the members number 90.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

In May, 1846, the school inspectors, Comfort Pennel, Edward Ballengee, and Henry Lemon, reported that they had divided the township into three school districts, No. 1, containing sections 35, 36, 25, and 26; No. 2, containing sections 23, 24, 13, and 14; and No. 3, containing sections 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, and 12. In October, the same year, Edward Ballengee, the director of District No. 1, made report that the children of school age (from four to eighteen years) in the district were 16, of whom 14 attended school. A term of three months' school had been taught, at a total expense of $15. Daniel Phillips, the director of District No. 3, reported that the children of school age in his district were 19.

In 1848, No. 1 had 25 children of school age; No. 2, 19; andNo. 3, 16.

A few years later a number of new districts were formed and school-houses provided. These were at first rude and plainly furnished, the entire cost seldom exceeding $100. A better class of buildings took their place, and the appropriations for the maintenance of schools were liberally increased. The condition of the schools in 1878 is shown by the following, which we quote from the school report of that year:

Number of districts 8
Number of children of school age 392
Number of attending school 260
Total value of school houses $4900

During the year 5 male and 11 female teachers were employed, and the schools were reported to be in a prosperous condition.

Since 1867 the school inspectors have been N. J. Morley, Isaac Hathaway, Japhet Godfrey, Franklin L. Weston, J. W. Whipple, Harvey L. Drew, Wm. M. T. Bartholomew, N. E. Landon, Solomon Maudlin, and David S. Evans. Those who have been elected to the office of superintendent have been George W. Bridgman, Wm. Williams, Jeremiah Nodine, Michael B. Houser, and David S. Evans.

BURIAL-GROUNDS.

The cemeteries of the township are small, and were conveniently located to afford interments in the several neighborhoods formed by the early settlers. The first was opened in 1850, on the northeast quarter of section 25; the next was opened three years later, at the Phillips school house; and a few years thereafter one was located in the western part of the township. Some of these are neatly kept, and contain appropriate monuments to the memory of those who had been among the pioneers of the county.

RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES.

The Methodists were the first to maintain public worship within the present bounds of Lake township. As early as 1846 a class of this faith was organized, at the school-house in the southeastern part of the township, by the Rev. George King, at that time preacher in charge of the Berrien circuit. Seeley H. Curtis was appointed leader, and the members consisted of persons belonging to the Hyatt, Heathman, Ballengee, and other families residing in the eastern part of Lake and the western part of Oronoko. In the course of a few years a revival ensued, which resulted in the conversion of nearly 100 persons. A class of Methodists has existed in the eastern part of Lake ever since, the place of worship being changed from one to the other school-house, to suit the convenience of the members in the respective localities. At present the meetings are held at the Buggies school-house. The class has eight members, and Clinton Hyatt is the leader. Here, also, is maintained a Sundayschool of nearly 100 members, which is superintended by Sarah Bartholomew.

In 1848, or later, a class was formed west of the Great Meadows, which had among its members the Williams, Shoemaker, and Sherwood families; but as these soon after removed the class here went down. The class at Bridgman became an organized body in 1865, V. P. Mead being the first leader. Here are at present 17 members, under the leadership of R. W. Plumb. The Sunday-school has 25 members, and Frank Weston is the superintendent. The services at this point are also held in the schoolhouse.

There is no church building in the township of Lake, but a few years ago the Methodists erected a parsonage at the village of Bridgman, which is near the centre of the present circuit.

The boundaries of the Methodist circuits in this and the adjoining townships have been subject to many changes. The circuits have borne various names, and generally embraced from six to eight appointments, numbering at present six, namely: Bridgman, Ruggles, Tryon, South Lincoln, Lincoln Avenue, and Stevensville.

The names of the circuits and pastoral connection have been as follows:

Berrien Circuit.-1846, Rev. George King; 1847, Revs. A. C. Shaw, A. Campbell, C. K. Ercanbrack; 1848, Revs. R. C. Meek, __ Tappan; 1849, Revs. H. Hall, B. F. Doughty; 1850, Revs. H. Hall, S. A. Lee; 1851-52, Revs. S. A. Osborne, S. Hendrickson; 1853, Rev. F. Glass; 1854, Rev. R. Pengelly; 1855, Revs. J. T. Robe, Thomas H. Bignall; 1856, Revs. W. C. Bliss, E. L. Kellogg; 1857, Rev. T. T. George; 1858, Rev. G. A. Van Horn; 1859, Revs. D. S. Haviland, D. Engle; 1860, Rev. L. M. Bennett; 1861, Rev. N. Cleveland; 1852, Rev. E. Beard.

Charlotteville Circut. (New Troy, Charlottesville, Lake, Spears, Tryon, Lincoln Avenue, Weesaw). 1865, Rev. John Byrns; 1866-67, Rev. Irving H. Skinner; 1868, Revs. William Friend, George Patterson; 1S69, Rev. J. S. Valentine.

Stevensville Circuit. 1870, Rev. J. S. Valentine; 1871, Rev. Irving H. Skinner; 1872, Rev. H. Taylor.

Laketon Circuit.-1870-71, Rev. J. W. H. Carlisle; 1872, Rev. N. Mount.

Bridgman Circuit..-(above united) 1873-74, Rev. V. H. Helms; 1875, Rev. Thomas E. Shenston; 1876, Rev. J. F. Wallace; 1877, Rev. J. R. Skinner.

The cause of Methodism in the above circuits has been greatly promoted by the labors of the Revs. Wm. Penland, Gould Parrish, Allen Conley, E. Allen, and Wm. M. Connelly, local preachers residing in this part of the county, the former two yet living in Royalton and Lincoln.

Since 1850 the United Brethren in Christ have maintained services in school-house No. 2, in connection with appointments in other townships, forming a circuit. Among the early members were the Pennells, Lemons, Browns, Waltons, and others, being at one time a large and flourishing congregation. At present the membership is small.

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