History of Deerfield, New Hampshire
FROM: HISTORY OF ROCKINGHAM AND STRAFFORD COUNTIES,
NEW HAMPSHIRE, WITH
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES
OF MANY OF ITS
PIONEERS AND PROMINENT MEN.

COMPILED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF
D. HAMILTON HURD.

ILLUSTRATED.
PHILADELPHIA:
J. W. LEWIS & CO. 1882
PRESS OF J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO., PHILADELPHIA

Typed by: Sharon Pustejovsky

CHAPTER XXIV.
DEERFIELD

Geographical - Topographical - Petition for Parish Incorporation - First Town-Meeting - Officers Elected - The Revolution - Ecclesiastical - Congregational Church - Baptist Church - The Deefield Academy - Attorneys - Physicians - Early Families - Delegates to Provincial Congress - Representatives and Town Clerks from 1789 to 1882.

DEERFIELD lies in the northwestern part of the county, and is bounded as follows: On the north by Northwood, on the east by Nottingham, on the south by Raymond and Candia, and on the west by Merrimac County.

The territory embraced within the bounds of the present town of Deerfield originally comprised a portion of Nottingham. The first petition for the organization of a separate parish was presented in 1756, but was not granted. In 1765 the inhabitants again petitioned for separation from the parent town and the prayer was granted, and the new parish took the name of Deerfield.

Incorporation. - The act of incorporation bears the date Jan. 8, 1766, and is signed by Governor Benning Wentworth. The petition was signed by the following persons: "Sam'l Leavitt, Obadiah Marston, Tho's Simpson, Eliphelet Griffeen, Abraham True, Isaac Shepard, Samuel Tilton, Peter Batchelder, Robert Cram, Patten Simpson, Nathaniel Batchelder, Jr., Thomas Brown, John Batchelder, Moses Thomson, Sam'l Hoyt, Peter Leavitt, Ephraim Pettingell, Eliphelet Marston, Theo Griffin, Reuben Marston, Benjamin Cotton, Josiah Smith, Samuel Elkins, Jude Allen, John cram, Samuel Kelley, Wadleigh cram, Sam'l Leavit, Junr, Samuel Marston, Reuben Brown, Nathan Griffeen, Reuben Marston, Theophilus Griffeen, Jun'r, Samuel Winslow, Nathaniel Meloon, Benjamin

1 Condensed by permission from Rev. E. C. Cogswell's excellent "History of Nottingham, Northwood, and Deerfield."

DEERFIELD 165

Page, Daniel Page, Samuel Perkins, Josiah Chase, Moses Chase, John Gile, nemiah cram, Joseph Graves, Jedediah Prescutt, David Batchelder, Josiah Prescutt, Samuel pulsfer, Josiah Sanbon, Thomas Robie, William Sanbon, Joseph Mason, John mason, Jeremiah Easman, Owen Runnels, Daniel West, Benjamin halyard, Benjamin Beachelder, Israel Clifford, John Robinson, Joseph Roberd, Joshua Young, Jeremiah Glidden, Joseph pidkins, Richard Gliden, Andrew Glidden, John Young, Jonathan Glidden, Jonathan Hill, Daniel Lad, John Lad, Nathaniel Smith, Benjamin Folsom, Moss Thirston, Jeremiah Foslom, Moses Clough, Increse Batcheler, Benjamin Batchelder, Nathan Batcheler, Josiah Sawyer, Samuel marston.

The First Town-Meeting. - The first legal meeting was held at the house of Samuel Leavitt on Thursday, the 30th day of January, 1766; Wadleigh Cram was chosen moderator; Thomas Simpson, Esq., parish clerk; Samuel Leavitt, John Robinson, Eliphalet Griffin, selectmen; Benjamin Batchelder, constable; John Gile, Jacob Longfellow, Daniel Ladd, Obediah Marston, and Nathaniel Maloon, surveyors of highways; Jonathan Glidden and Samuel Tilton, assessors; Abram True and Jeremiah Eastman, auditors; Jedediah Prescott, Jeremiah Eastman, Samuel Tilton, Benjamin Folsom, Thomas Burleigh, Capt. Samuel Leavitt, Thomas Simpson were chosen "a Committee to look out for a Suitable Place to Sett a meeting-house upon and a Return att the next anual Meeting from under the major part of their hands and the Same to be received or Rejected by the Parish as they Shall think proper."

Fifteen pounds lawful money were voted to be "assessed to defray parish charges."

The first annual meeting was held "at the house of Wadleigh Crams," March 18, 1766, when John Robinson was chosen moderator; Thomas Simpson, parish clerk; and the same men for selectmen as last year; Dr. Jonathan Hill and Jeremiah Eastman were chosen auditors.

A new committee was raised for locating the meeting-house. "Voted Jn'o Robinson, Abram True, Eliphalet Eastman, Samuel Winslow, Nehemiah Cram be a Committee to Look out a Suitable place for to Sett a meeting-house on and Look out where the Roads will best accommodate to Come to Said Meeting-house."

The first money voted to be raised for preaching the gospel was fifteen pounds, on the 15th day of December, 1766. At the same time it was voted, "That Capt. John Dudley be the Person to Look out for Some Suitable to supply the Parish of Deerfield with Preaching So far as the money above voted shall Extend."

The Revolution. - Deerfield was active in its opposition to British oppression, contributed liberally in men and money. It appears that men from Deerfield gallantly fought at Lexington and in Rhode Island, and wherever New England men were found struggling for liberty. The names of eighteen persons from this town who died in the Revolution are preserved.1 It is believed that Maj. John Simpson fired the first gun upon the British with fatal result in that immortal battle at Bunker Hill. It was a premature discharge of his musket, but one that was immediately followed by a general engagement. Maj. Simpson died Oct. 28, 1825. Joseph Mills, an officer in Col. Cilley's regiment during the Revolution, was afterwards an efficient magistrate and a worthy representative. He died in June, 1809, aged sixty years. Hon. Richard Jenness, who acted so important a part in the early history of this town, died July 4, 1819, aged seventy-three years, greatly respected as a magistrate, representative, senator, and judge of the Common Pleas Court.

One hundred and thirty-nine of the inhabitants subscribed to the following declaration and fourteen refused: "We, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage and promise that we will to the utmost of our power, at the risk of our lives and fortunes, with arms oppose the hostile proceedings of the British Fleets and Armies against the United American Colonies."

Ecclesiastical. - The first religious services in the town were held by the Congregationalists, and the first settled pastor was Rev. Timothy Upham, who officiated in that office from 1772 until his death in 1811. His successors have been as follows: Rev. Nathaniel Wells, 1812-41; Rev. Ephraim Nelson, 1841-49; Rev. William A. Patten, 1850-52; (for three years the pulpit was supplied by Rev. W. A. Forbes and E. F. Abbott); Rev. U. W. Condit, 1855-64; Rev. Lyman White succeeded the second ministry of Mr. Patten, commencing his labors in 1874. Rev. Mr. White graduated from Dartmouth in 1846; at Andover in 1849; preached at Epping five years, at Easton (Mass.) seven years, at Phillipston (Mass.) eight years, at Pembroke (N. H.) four years and a half.

Baptist Church. - This church was organized in 1770 with fourteen members. The first pastor was Elifelet Smith. It was disbanded in 1787. A branch of the Brentwood Church was organized soon after, which subsequently became extinct, and in 1816 (September 12th) the "First Baptist Church of Deerfield" was organized.

The first house of worship occupied by the Baptists was built 1770, and located about one mile and a half southeast of the centre of the town. In 1822 it was removed to the centre and occupied in connection with the Free-Will Baptists, and was called the "Union Meeting-House." The Baptists completed and dedicated their present sanctuary in October, 1834.

Among those who have occupied the pastoral office are mentioned Revs. James Barnaby, Isaac Merring,

1 For list see history of Nottingham elsewhere in this work.

166 HISTORY OF ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Bela Wilcox, Isaac Sanger, O. O. Stearns, Noah Hooper, James N. Chase, L. C. Stevens, Edward T. Lyford, Oliver Ayer, Henry O. Walker, etc.

Free-Will Baptist Church. - This church was organized in 1799. They worshiped many years in the Union meeting-house, which was burned in 1839, and rebuilt in 1840 by the Free-Will Baptist people alone, and is occupied by them now. This house is pleasantly located at the centre of the town, midway between the Congregational and Calvin Baptist Churches.

Among those who have labored as pastors of this church are John Kimball, S. B. Dyer, I. S. Davis, G. D. Garland, P. S. Burbank, C. S. Smith, Aaron Ayer, Ezra Turtle, G. S. Hill, and Ira Emery. Mr. Emery came here in 1871. He studied theology at Bangor Seminary, and was ordained at Industry, Me., Sept. 9, 1868. He was dismissed from Deerfield in 1876, and was followed by E. Blake, the present pastor.

The Deerfield Academy. - The families that settled here and on lands contiguous were to an unusual degree possessed of wealth and intellectual culture; and besides caring for the district school, they supported a high school, which for many years was known as the academy, founded about 1798 by Joseph Mills, Esq., Col. Joseph Hilton, Gen. Benjamin Butler, Maj. Isaac Shepard, and Andrew Freeze, Esq. It was a flourishing school in its day. Phineas Howe, a young lawyer at the Parade, was its first preceptor, and continued at its head until about 1812. Mr. Jewett, Nathan T. Hilton, and "Master James Husey" were the most prominent successors of Mr. Howe.

This academy building was ultimately sold to the Parade school district, and destroyed by fire about 1842.

Attorneys. - Among the attorneys who have practiced here were David Frank, Edmund Toppem, Phineas Howe, Moody Kent, Josiah Butler, Jason Merrill, N. P. Hoar, D. Steele, Jr., F. H. Davis, Josiah Houghton, Ira St. Clair, Nathaniel Dearborn, and H. G. Cilley.

In addition to the above, Francis D. Randall, of Deerfield, was register of deeds from 1834 to 1840.

Richard Jenness was judge of Court of Common Pleas from 1809 to 1813.

Dudley Freese was judge of Court of Common Pleas from 1832 to 1842.

Benjamin Jenness was sheriff from 1830 to 1835. He was son of Judge Richard Jenness.

Peter Chadwick was clerk of the Court of Common Pleas from 1817 to 1834, and clerk of the Superior Court from 1829 to 1837.

Peter Sanborn was for several years State treasurer.

Physicians. - The physicians of Deerfield have been Edmund Chadwick, Thomas Brown, Stephen Brown, John Hidden, Dr. Young, and Dr. G. H. Towle. Dr. Towle is a native of Deerfield, and has an extensive practice.

Early families. - Among the early families are mentioned those of Batchelder, Bean, Brown, Butler, Cate, Chadwick, Chase, Churchill, Cilley, Collins, Cram, Currier, Dearborn, Eastman, Freese, French, Furnald, Gerrish, Gilman, Griffin, Haines, Hilton, Hoag, James, Jenness, Maloon, Marston, Mills, Moore, Page, Prescott, Rand, Sanborn, Sawyer, Simpson, Smith, Stevens, G. H. Towle, Thompson, Tilton, True, Veasey, Weare, Whittier, White, and Woodman.

Delegates to Provincial Congress. - The following is a list of delegates to Provincial Congress from 1774 to 1788, inclusive:

1774, Jan. 25. - Capt. Daniel Moore, Moses Marshal, deputies to meet at Exeter to choose delegates to represent the province at Philadelphia.

1775, May 8. - Simon Marston, Timothy Upham, delegates to Provincial Congress at Exeter.

1775, Dec. 12. - Jeremiah Eastman, representative for parishes of Deerfield and Northwood to a Congress to be held at Exeter, Dec. 21, 1775.

1776, Dec. 2. - Jeremiah Eastman, representative for Deerfield and Northwood, at Exeter, third Wednesday, December.

1777, Dec. 11. - Jeremiah Eastman, representative for Deerfield and Northwood, at Exeter.

1778, May 28. - Simon Marston, Richard Jenness, delegates at convention to be holden at Concord, June 10th next, to frame and lay a permanent form of government.

1778, Dec. 1. - Jeremiah Eastman, representative to Congress at Exeter, for one year.

1779, Nov. 30. - Jeremiah Eastman, representative to Congress at Exeter, for one year.

1780, Dec. 5. - Simon Marston, representative to Congress at Exeter, for one year.

1781, Dec. 4. - Jeremiah Eastman, representative for Deerfield and Northwood.

1782, May 13. - Joseph ____, Dr. Edmund Chadwick, delegates to Convention at Concord on the first Wednesday in June to frame a constitution.

1783, Dec. 1. - Jeremiah Eastman, representative to General Assembly, Concord, first Wednesday in December next.

1784. - Jeremiah Easton, representative to General Assembly, Concord, third Wednesday in June.

1785. - Moses Barnard, representative to General Assembly, Concord.

1786. - Moses Barnard, representative to General Assembly, Concord.

1787. - Voted not to send.

1788, Jan. 14. - Dr. Edmund Chadwick, delegate to Exeter, Feb. 13th, agreeably to request of General Assembly.

1788, March 18. - Richard Jenness, representative General Assembly at Concord.

REPRESENTATIVES AND TOWN CLERKS FROM 1789 to 1878.

1789. - Richard Jenness, representative; Jeremiah Eastman, clerk.
1790. - Joseph March, representative; Jeremiah Eastman, clerk.
1791. - Joseph March, representative; Jeremiah Eastman, clerk.
1792. - Joseph March, representative; Jeremiah Eastman, clerk.
1793. - Joseph March, representative; Jeremiah Eastman, clerk.
1794. - Joseph March, representative; Jeremiah Eastman, clerk.
1795. - Joseph March, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1796. - Joseph Mills, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1797. - Dr. Edmund Chadwick, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1798. - Richard Jenness, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1799. - Joseph Mills, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1800. - Richard Jenness, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1801. - Richard Jenness, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1802. - Richard Jenness, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1803. - Capt. Peter Sanborn, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1804. - Richard Jenness, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1805. - Col. Moses Barnard, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1806. - Col. Moses Barnard, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1807. - Col. Thomas Jenness, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1808. - Isaac Shephard, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.

DEERFIELD 167

1809. - Isaac Shephard, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1810. - Isaac Shephard, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1811. - Col. Thomas Jenness, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1812. - Isaac Shephard, representative; Nathaniel Freese, clerk.
1813. - Benjamin Butler, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1814. - Josiah Butler, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1815. - Josiah Butler, representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1816. - Josiah Butler and Thomas Robinson, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1817. - Thomas Robinson and Jacob Freese, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1818. - Thomas Robinson and Jacob Freese, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1819. - Thomas Robinson and Jacob Freese, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1820. - Thomas Robinson and Jacob Freese, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1821. - Andrew Page, first representative; no choice for a second representative; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1822. - Andrew Page and John S. Jenness, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1823. - Jacob Freese and John S. Jenness, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1824. - Jacob Freese and Daniel Haines, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1825. - Daniel Haines and Gilbert Chadwick, representatives; Nathaniel Weare, clerk.
1826. - Gilbert Chadwick and Dudley Freese, representatives; Nathaniel Weare and Benjamin Stevens, clerks.
1827. - Dudley Freese and Benning W. Sanborn, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1828. - Dudley Freese and Benjamin Jenness, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1829. - Benjamin Jenness and Winthrop Hilton, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1830. - Benjamin Jenness, Andrew Freese, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1831. - Andrew Freese and Samuel Collins, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1832. - Andrew Freese and Samuel Collins, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1833. - B. W. Sanborn and Joseph Merrill, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1834. - B. W. Sanborn and Joseph Merrill, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1835. - Peter Jenness and John James, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1836. - Peter Jenness and John James, representatives; Benjamin Stevens, clerk.
1837. - Stephen Cram and J. W. James, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1838. - Stephen Cram and J. W. James, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1839. - Ira St. Clair and Benjamin Jenness, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1840. - Ira St. Clair and Benjamin James, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1841. - Peter Sanborn and Thomas D. Robinson, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1842. - Peter Sanborn and Thomas D. Robinson, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1843. - Stephen Prescott and Samuel S. Melloon, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1844. - Stephen Prescott and Samuel S. Melloon, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1845. - Samuel B. Page and Elbridge Tilton, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1846. - John James and George W. Prescott, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1847. - Elbridge Tilton and John Page, Jr., representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1848. - George W. Prescott and John Dearborn, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1849. - Samuel Woodman, Jr., John Dearborn, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1850. - Jeremiah Batchelder and S. G. Carswell, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1851. - William Whittier and H. G. Cilley, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1852. - William Whittier and H. G. Cilley, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1853. - A. L. Jenness and Thomas Veasey, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1854. - A. L. Jenness and Thomas Veasey, representatives; Edmund Chadwick, clerk.
1855. - John Robinson, Jr., first representative; no choice for second representative; Joseph J. Mills, clerk.
1856. - John S. Hidden and Jeremiah Fellows, representatives; Edmund Rand, clerk.
1857. - John S. Robinson, Jeremiah Fellows, representatives; Joseph J. Mills, clerk.
1858. - Eben Marston and Joseph C. Cram, representatives; Joseph J. Mills, clerk.
1859. - Eben Marston and Joseph C. Cram, representatives; Joseph J. Mills, clerk.
1860. - Joseph J. Dearborn, first representative; voted not to send second representative; Joseph J. Mills, clerk.
1861. - Joseph J. Dearborn and Sewell Goodhue, representatives; Isaac H. Morrison, clerk.
1862. - John M. Freese and Benjamin S. Brown, representatives; Isaac H. Morrison, clerk.
1863. - John M. Freese and John S. Robinson, representatives; John S. French, clerk.
1864. - Benjamin S. Brown, Ezra A. J. Sawyer, representatives; John A. Law, clerk.
1865. - Ezra A. J. Sawyer and Isaac H. Morrison, representatives; John R. Law, clerk.
1866. - Isaac H. Morrison, James Bean, representatives; John R. Law, clerk.
1867. - James Bean and Richard J. Sanborn, representatives; Jonathan H. Bachelder, clerk.
1868. - Abraham G. Ladd, Joseph R. Gerrish, representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1869. - Joseph R. Gerrish and Richard J. Sanborn, representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1870. - Joseph H. Veasey, Abraham G. Ladd, representatives; J. Frank Prescott, clerk.
1871. - Jonathan D. Cate, Jeremy Rawlins, Jr., representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1872. - Jonathan D. Cate and Jeremy Rawlins, Jr., representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1873. - Stephen Prescott, Jr., George P. Prescott, representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1874. - Stephen Prescott, Jr., George P. Prescott, representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1875. - John B. Legro, Martin W. Childs, representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1876. - John C. Brown, Martin W. Childs, representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1877. - John C. Brown, George J. French, representatives; J. F. Prescott, clerk.
1878. - Joseph H. Veasey, Samuel Woodman, representatives; Charles E. P. Hoyt, clerk.

For "Military Record" 1861-65, see history of Nottingham elsewhere in this work.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

HON. J. J. DEARBORN.


The pioneers of the Dearborn family in Upper Rockingham were two young men, cousins-german, who, about 1772, established themselves, the one, Henry (afterwards major-general, Secretary of War, etc.), at Nottingham as a physician, and the other, Edward, at Deerfield as a farmer. Edward died suddenly in the prime of life, and his eldest son, Sewall,

168 HISTORY OF ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, NEW HAMPSHIRE.

succeeded to the homestead, where he passed a long and useful life.

Hon. Joseph J. Dearborn, whose portrait herewith appears, was the son of Sewall and Sarah Dow Dearborn, and was born March 8, 1818. He had the usual advantages of schooling then common to most country boys, and at an early age obtained employment in a country store. On attaining his majority he began business for himself at the old "Jenness store," at Deerfield South Road. When about twenty-five years of age he removed to Bangor, Me., where for a term of years he was engaged in the hardware trade, until on account of broken health he was compelled to retire from all active business. He finally returned to his native town, and soon after established a shoe-factory, and for more than twenty years pursued that business at South Deerfield, where he still resides. Mr. Dearborn is a man of positive convictions, active temperament, and great earnestness of purpose, and through many years of active life has borne among his neighbors a prominent part in all those questions that an eventful period has successively brought forward. He has from time to time held most of the offices within the gift of his townsmen, and in 1860 and 1861 represented his town in the General Court, and in 1865 and 1866 his district in the New Hampshire State Senate.

Mr. Joseph Henry Dearborn, of Pembroke, is his only surviving child.

EZRA A. J. SAWYER.


Ezra A. J. Sawyer was born in Deerfield, N. H., Nov. 3, 1828. His great-grandfather, Josiah Sawyer, was one of the original proprietors of Nottingham. His wife was a sister of Jeremiah Eastman, who surveyed the town of Deerfield. E. A. J. Sawyer is a son of John and Clarissa (Chesley) Sawyer, and grandson of David, third son of Josiah. He was
reared a farmer, and received a common-school and academical education, and in early manhood taught school. May 24, 1853, he married Sarah Collins, daughter of Joseph Bean and Lydia H. Collins, who was a daughter of Col. Samuel Collins; she was born April 8, 1830. Their children are Fred. B., born April 16, 1854; John F., born March 2, 1856; and Mabel J., born April 11, 1861*. Mr. Sawyer was appointed collector of taxes as soon as he was old enough to hold the position, and in 1855 was appointed deputy sheriff, which office he has held uninterruptedly (with the exception of two years) to the present time. He was representative to the State Legislature in 1865-66, and has been justice of the peace and quorum throughout the State for many years. He was appointed postmaster in 1874, and still holds the appointment. In politics, Mr. Sawyer is a Republican, stanch yet liberal.

His life has been a very active one, and it is characteristic of him that whatever he undertakes to do he does thoroughly. He is strict in the performance of his duty, but withal a kind-hearted man and warm friend, honest and honorable. He is an attendant of the Congregational Church, of which Mrs. Sawyer is a member. Mr. Sawyer's sons left home for Dubuque, Iowa, in 1874, where they remained about two years. The youngest traveled quite extensively in a business capacity, but both are now settled at Lead City, Dak., one a hotel-keeper, the other engaged in lumber business. The daughter has attended Packer Institute in Brooklyn, N. Y., but is now at home.

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